We Must Do Better with Alaska Public Education

In what country does the DOJ/FBI go after parents for voicing their concerned over their child’s education? Not a free country, and not this country.12 Parents are the essential part of a child’s learning, children in Alaska have been time and time again, failed.

Alaskan taxpayers are hit yearly with more and more money to go to the administration costs, while students are left with a failing system. The Alaska education system has become a vacuum of taxpayer money, while many feel the focus is on political ideology rather than assuring all Alaskan children receive the best educational instruction possible. Our education system is over funded, just as our government is, just as our medical care. Money funneling to these entities that are not serving the best interest of Alaskans, especially our children.

Is it really worth so much money for incompetence? We’re at the bottom of the bowl here, yet we’re just gonna keep funneling money into the education system? I’d rather have kids enrolled to charter schools, where they actually get an education. We should not be funding incompetence, whether it’s the teacher or the administration. Our whole school board system needs to be merged. I believe we have 52 school boards. We don’t need that many. That’s ridiculous. That’s just pouring more money out for nothing.

We should consolidate those school boards, and then parents should have the choice of where to send their children, whether they choose homeschooling or charter private schools. Student money should follow the student. It shouldn’t be up to the school board where your child has to go. No, it should be up to the parent where they want to educate their child. A student’s funds should follow them wherever they are.

Our children are so vulnerable. It’s up to us as adults to guide them in the right direction. When teachers and the school administration are more worried about unicorn colored cupcakes, children’s grades suffer. I had to pull my child out of school because, in Anchor Point, they’re more worried about his gender than his grades. It seems like all these public schools want to do is manipulate our children against us. We’re setting them up for failure by allowing this to continue. Where were these kids going to end up after they graduate high school, if they make it to graduation?

Parents should get the money the school board gets to give their child a proper education. One family in Anchor Point has four younger children, the oldest isn’t even a teenager yet. Additionally, they homeschool other children in their community. She receives state funding for these other children and homeschools them in her home. I think that’s awesome. The kids are getting an excellent education so they can apply to college if they choose to or get a trade and move further in life rather than having graduated high school with a ninth-grade education that doesn’t help them in life.

It’s time to get tough, it’s time to hold them all accountable!

This is done by requiring any and all entities to adhere to a yearly Audit, consolidate school districts, create backpack funding, and hold our government accountable. cutting and trimming the fat, hold our medical facilities and staff accountable for Medicaid funding taken, they must be made to adhere to our constitutional rights, and demand transparency.

If you will vote for me, Walter Jones for Alaska State Senate District C, we will hold these entities responsible to the people! Rather than the people being controlled by an overbearing government and our states wealth stolen.

Alaska employs some 8,500 teachers, many on their Alaska Adventure.

Alaska public education has been in crisis for a long time. For the amount we have paid for teachers and administrators–since oil started going through the Trans-Alaska Pipeline in 1974–Alaska should have been able to buy the BEST EDUCATORS IN THE WORLD! Instead we have bought POOR EDUCATORS protected from being more than mediocre by the teacher union, NEA-Alaska.

Parents often love the teachers of their children, and we all admire good teachers, but let’s look at the academic outcomes we are getting in schools of our communities in this senate district, as reported by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) and Alaska Department of Education and Childhood Development (AKDEED).

Assessment is a tool for measuring what students know and what they can do. Alaska’s assessment system shows how knowledgeable a student is on a particular area or subject according to Alaska’s educational standards. Assessment is part of providing an excellent education for every student every day.

Statewide assessment ensures that families, teachers, administrators, and community leaders can see how students perform across the state. The information gathered from assessments helps guide policy decisions, curriculum selection, professional learning for teachers and staff, instructional decisions, and parent support recommendations.

Alaska Department of Education and Childhood Development (AKDEED) https://education.alaska.gov/assessments

NAEP Data available is from 2019. New assessment tests will be administered in October 2022. Links are provided to see long-term trends.

Status Report: Alaska’s Academic Status

Grade 4 Mathematics was 232, lower than the national average score of 240.3 Grade 4 Reading was 204, lower than the national average score of 219.4 Grade 8 Mathematics score has declined from 284 in 2009 to 274 in 2019 while the national average has remained level at 281.5 Grade 8 Reading score was 252, a full ten points below the national average of 262.6

ASSESSMENTAVERAGE SCOREACHIEVEMENT LEVELS
SubjectGradeYearScoreDifference from National public (NP)At or above BasicAt or above ProficientAt Advanced
Mathematics (scale range 0–500)42019232-873335
Mathematics (scale range 0–500)42017230-971325
Mathematics (scale range 0–500)42015236-478356
Mathematics (scale range 0–500)42013236-577376
Mathematics (scale range 0–500)42011236-478376
Mathematics (scale range 0–500)42009237-278386
Mathematics (scale range 0–500)42007237-279386
Mathematics (scale range 0–500)42005236-277345
Mathematics (scale range 0–500)42003233-175304
Mathematics (scale range 0–500)41996¹224+165212
Reading (scale range 0–500)42019204-1553255
Reading (scale range 0–500)42017207-1456286
Reading (scale range 0–500)42015213-961306
Reading (scale range 0–500)42013209-1158276
Reading (scale range 0–500)42011208-1256265
Reading (scale range 0–500)42009211-859275
Reading (scale range 0–500)42007214-562296
Reading (scale range 0–500)42005211-658275
Reading (scale range 0–500)42003212-558286

Results of 2021 Peaks Performance Evaluation for Senate District C:

Kodiak Island Borough School District’s Academic Report Card

Kodiak elementary schools:

  • East Elementary School
  • Main Elementary School
  • North Star Elementary School
  • Peterson Elementary School

Kodiak secondary schools:

  • Kodiak Middle School
  • Kodiak High School

Rural schools (all K-12):

  • Akhiok School
  • Chiniak School
  • Karluk School
  • Larsen Bay School (Closed for the 2018–2019 school year.)
  • Old Harbor School
  • Ouzinkie School
  • Port Lions School
 Advanced/ProficientBelow/Far Below Proficient   
SubgroupCountPercentage1CountPercentage1EnrollmentParticipation RateGroup
English Language Arts38942.47%52757.53%1,19576.49% View
Mathematics32335.49%58764.51%1,19575.98% View

Seward’s Academic Report Card

William H. Seward Elementary School Report Card

 Advanced/ProficientBelow/Far Below Proficient   
SubgroupCountPercentage1CountPercentage1EnrollmentParticipation RateGroup
English Language Arts3944.83%4855.17%10384.47% View
Mathematics2832.56%5867.44%10383.50% View

Seward Middle School Report Card

 Advanced/ProficientBelow/Far Below Proficient   
SubgroupCountPercentage1CountPercentage1EnrollmentParticipation RateGroup
English Language Arts4348.86%4551.14%11874.58% View
Mathematics3134.83%5865.17%11875.42% View

Cordova’s Academic Report Card

Mt. Eccles Elementary

 Advanced/ProficientBelow/Far Below Proficient   
SubgroupCountPercentage1CountPercentage1EnrollmentParticipation RateGroup
English Language Arts3852.78%3447.22%7497.30% View
Mathematics2940.28%4359.72%7597.33% View

Cordova Jr/Sr High School

 Advanced/ProficientBelow/Far Below Proficient   
SubgroupCountPercentage1CountPercentage1EnrollmentParticipation RateGroup
English Language Arts3253.33%2846.67%6098.33% View
Mathematics2033.90%3966.10%6096.67% View

Kachemak Bay ‘s Academic Status Report

Kachemak Selo School

Year Completed: Unbuilt
Total sf: 18,720
Client: Kenai Peninsula Borough
Price: $5.39 million

 Advanced/ProficientBelow/Far Below Proficient   
SubgroupCountPercentage1CountPercentage1EnrollmentParticipation RateGroup
English Language Arts444.44%555.56%1275.00% View
Mathematics*25% or fewer*75% or more1275.00% View

Ninilchik’s Academic Status Report

Ninilchik School

Ninilchik School is a K-12 school in Ninilchik, Alaska, serving the communities of Ninilchik, Anchor Point, Kasilof, and Clam Gulch. It is the oldest school on the Kenai Peninsula, originally opened in 1910.

 Advanced/ProficientBelow/Far Below Proficient   
SubgroupCountPercentage1CountPercentage1EnrollmentParticipation RateGroup
English Language Arts1435.90%2564.10%4097.50% View
Mathematics923.08%3076.92%4097.50% View

Kasilof‘s Academic Status Report

Tustamina Elementary School

 Advanced/ProficientBelow/Far Below Proficient   
SubgroupCountPercentage1CountPercentage1EnrollmentParticipation RateGroup
English Language Arts3145.59%3754.41%6797.01% View
Mathematics2333.82%4566.18%6797.01% View
  1. https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/justice-department-addresses-violent-threats-against-school-officials-and-teachers []
  2. https://defendinged.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/Email-Correspondence_NSBA-Letter-to-President-Biden_Redacted.pdf []
  3. https://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/subject/publications/stt2019/pdf/2020013AK4.pdf []
  4. https://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/subject/publications/stt2019/pdf/2020014AK4.pdf []
  5. https://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/subject/publications/stt2019/pdf/2020013AK8.pdf []
  6. https://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/subject/publications/stt2019/pdf/2020014AK8.pdf []
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